THIS WEEK'S BLOG

Joan Halifax
Book Excerpts

The Path That Leads Into the Mountains

In 1993, Zen teacher Joan Halifax published a book called The Fruitful Darkness based on her anthropological engagements with Tibetan Buddhists, Mexican shamans, Native American elders and other tribal communities.

Aldous Huxley
Book Excerpts

Aldous Huxley and Beauty

Huxley on the beatific vision of divine beauty that resides in Pure Interval and harmonious relationship, and experiencing the divine through architecture, music, sacred geometries and human relationships.

FEATURED AUTHORS AND POETS

BOOK EXCERPTS

Joan Halifax

The Path That Leads Into the Mountains

In 1993, Zen teacher Joan Halifax published a book called The Fruitful Darkness based on her anthropological engagements with Tibetan Buddhists, Mexican shamans, Native American elders and other tribal communities.

Read More »
Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley and Beauty

Huxley on the beatific vision of divine beauty that resides in Pure Interval and harmonious relationship, and experiencing the divine through architecture, music, sacred geometries and human relationships.

Read More »

Life and Death Do Not Exist

In this short chapter from the Shobogenzo, Sho-ji, Dogen plays with the distinction between the nuances of the two different meanings, life and death being static and self-defined events, which he argues have no substance or existence, and living and dying which are an endless flow of events and dynamic being

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THE ALAN WATTS CORNER

Caroline Goodwin

Why I Write – Caroline Goodwin

Writing can be anything, from self-discovery to incorporating pain to establishing direction, according to poet Caroline Goodwin, who featured in The Dewdrop a couple of weeks ago with her poem, Not I’ll Not, from her book, Custody of the Eyes. 

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THE BEATS

BROWSE BY THEME

MYSTICS

POPULAR READS

Zen Tree

FROM THE ZEN GARDEN

Bankei and the Unborn

17th century Zen master Bankei on the Unborn, the unconditioned mind that comes up spontaneously and is fundamental to every person, without exception.

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Am I Conscious Now?

“What does it mean to ask a question? Is there some magic in the inquisitive brain?” Susan Blackmore’s lifelong investigation into consciousness encompasses Zen practice and the recurring question: Am I conscious now?

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Chiyono’s Enlightenment Poem

Adachi Chiyono (also known as Mugai Nyodai) was the daughter of a samurai warrior in the 13th century who became the first woman – and mother – to found and head a Zen monastery in Japan.

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KEEP READING

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Imagine That Our Only Job is to Mirror Each Other’s Goodness

Ruth King is a writer and Buddhist teacher who focuses on working with racial identity in learning meditation and using the tools of spiritual practice to examine one’s own racial being. King combines western psychology with eastern philosophy and indigenous wisdom to coach her students in becoming more aware of their underlying areas of fear and vulnerability as well as the key points of their own rigidity.

If Love Will Not Swing Wide the Gates, No Other Power Will

James Baldwin describes his own coming of age and awakening to spiritual and political consciousness as beginning with the revelation of sin: ‘I became, during my fourteenth year, for the first time in my life, afraid—afraid of the evil within me and afraid of the evil without.’

The Ground is Always Shifting – Pema Chodron

The acceptance of the fundamental changing, impermanent nature of the world is at the heart of Buddhist philosophy and is a constant theme through Pema Chodron’s teachings. When things fall apart, when the ground is pulled out from under us, it is not a cause for panic, but rather a cause for celebration.

The Inscrutable Energy that Preserves the Breach

In this excerpt from an article published prior to the release of Between the World and Me, Coates talks about his childhood in West Baltimore. He describes the gap he felt between his own world and the world he saw through the TV set, as well as the perplexity and disingenuity of being fed a stream of non-violent role models at school.

F*cked Up, but Always Beautiful

Tim Desmond writes about his wife’s terminal illness, and his revelation about the way in which his deep love for his wife was manifesting as anxiety, and because of it he was missing their shared moments of beauty.

Being With Dying – Kerry Egan

In her years working as a hospice chaplain, spiritual caregiver and author Kerry Egan has rarely found that dying patients want to discuss God or religion. Instead, chaplaincy work for her leans on the quality of the presence she can offer her patients and the compassion and empathy with which she can hold space for them and their stories.

Running After Loves – Ray Bradbury on Fostering Hunger in Writing

‘How long has it been since you wrote a story where your real love or your real hatred somehow got onto the paper?’ Finding the truth of our authentic passions is the key to forming the foundations of a writing practice, according to science fiction author Ray Bradbury.

What Are We Calling “I”?

We often identify ourselves with the events that have happened to us and the things we have done, rather than the subjective center of experience itself. In an echo of the Buddhist teaching of the absence of a permanent self, Harris asserts that when the absence of this self is found, then ‘the feeling of being a self disappears.’

Samia Singh – The Storms Within

Samia Singh’s The Storms Within launches our new section Micro Gallery, where we host a small, specially curated exhibition by a visual artist. The Storms Within is a series of etchings created by Punjabi-born Singh during a residency in Florence. She tells the story of how the prints came about and what she learned during her time in Italy.

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Joan Halifax

The Path That Leads Into the Mountains

In 1993, Zen teacher Joan Halifax published a book called The Fruitful Darkness based on her anthropological engagements with Tibetan Buddhists, Mexican shamans, Native American elders and other tribal communities.

Read More »
Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley and Beauty

Huxley on the beatific vision of divine beauty that resides in Pure Interval and harmonious relationship, and experiencing the divine through architecture, music, sacred geometries and human relationships.

Read More »
Jennifer Hollis

Jennifer Hollis – Baby Boy Hollis

Jennifer Hollis’ poem sits on the threshold of motherhood, at the moment of transition when the personal and intimately known is sent out into a world keen to lay claim to it with a designation.

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Raymond P. Hammond

Raymond P. Hammond – F Train

“While I often found the emergence from the dark of the tunnel shocking, as my eyes would adjust and I would look forward and skyward, I always found this image to be comforting, reassuring.”

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Alice Walker

Only Justice Can Stop a Curse

In this essay about anger and injustice, writer and social activist Alice Walker begins by presenting a curse prayer found by Zora Neale Hurston that is more than a century old.

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