THIS WEEK'S BLOG

Bodhidharma
Book Bits

Bodhidharma’s Bloodstream Sermon

Bodhidharma’s fundamental teaching was that the Buddha can only be found in the mind since its essence is mind itself.

Seamus Heaney
Poetry

Seamus Heaney – The Peninsula

Seamus Heaney’s beautiful poem about where we go when we leave our heads and dig into something more fundamental.

Dad Too Late

BY KENT JACOBSON
My father clomped through life with boots—“Your mother will turn you into a softy”— and died early.

Yes, This

BY APRIL NANCE
I have a photograph of my childhood self taken by my Aunt Sandy. In the picture she has tamed my scraggly hair and combed it into a neat blonde bob.

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BOOK OF THE MONTH

Gin and Coconut Curry

Gin and Coconut Curry

BY CHAPIN CIMINO
What stays with us over the decades: Navigating the grey mists of love and affection by the quirky light of a college friendship.

FEATURED AUTHORS AND POETS

BOOK EXCERPTS

Jordan Kisner

Ordinary Devotions

Jordan Kisner’s essay titled, ‘Soon This Space Will Be Too Small’, is a short musing about circular themes and thoughts that can revolve around a whole lifetime.

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Susan Murphy

The Great, Generous Laugh

Susan Murphy’s book, The Red Thread, addresses the guts and gore of the flesh-and-blood humans who sustain spiritual practice in the midst of desire, mortality and heartbreak.

Read More »
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THE ALAN WATTS CORNER

Caroline Goodwin

Why I Write – Caroline Goodwin

Writing can be anything, from self-discovery to incorporating pain to establishing direction, according to poet Caroline Goodwin, who featured in The Dewdrop a couple of weeks ago with her poem, Not I’ll Not, from her book, Custody of the Eyes. 

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THE BEATS

BROWSE BY THEME

MYSTICS

POPULAR READS

Zen Tree

FROM THE ZEN GARDEN

Ryokan – Playing with the Children

Ryokan loved children, and played with them so much that other adults began to question his sanity. He says, ‘Even if I were able to say something/how could I explain?’ His wholehearted immersion in playful activity is the essence of Ryokan’s very particular Zen expression.

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Bankei and the Unborn

17th century Zen master Bankei on the Unborn, the unconditioned mind that comes up spontaneously and is fundamental to every person, without exception.

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Am I Conscious Now?

“What does it mean to ask a question? Is there some magic in the inquisitive brain?” Susan Blackmore’s lifelong investigation into consciousness encompasses Zen practice and the recurring question: Am I conscious now?

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Chiyono’s Enlightenment Poem

Adachi Chiyono (also known as Mugai Nyodai) was the daughter of a samurai warrior in the 13th century who became the first woman – and mother – to found and head a Zen monastery in Japan.

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KEEP READING

Helen Macdonald

The Magic Lives of Swifts

The twilight excursions of swifts echo the solemnity of certain spiritual rituals, when the earth is quiet enough that we can relocate our own bearings in relation to the world.

Alexandra Horowitz

What is Attention?

Alexandra Horowitz asks, what does it really mean to pay attention? Is it beneficial? And how can we be better at it?

j-krishnamurti

Love and Death are Inseparable

Jiddu Krishnamurti’s diaries reveal his ‘process’ and daily engagement with the the experience of his own consciousness and encounters with the unknown.

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Alan Watts and Divine Play

Alan Watts delves into one of his favorite and recurring subjects – the way in which we over-identify with the parts we play.

The God of Ideas

Huston Smith on how his intellect and love of ideas brought him into a closer relationship with God, in an activity known as jnana, the Indian form of yoga centered around knowledge.

At Sea With Don Quixote – Thomas Mann

Thomas Mann’s ‘Voyage With Don Quixote’ is an account of the author’s voyage by sea to New York in 1934 during which he was accompanied by Cervantes’ great novel.

How Does It Feel To Be a Problem?

More than a century ago, the writer, historian, sociologist and civil rights activist W. E. B. Du Bois wrote about the unasked question that followed him everywhere: how does it feel to be a problem?

The Absolute Nature of Suffering

Zadie Smith asks whether the discourse about privilege still applies in the same way when we consider the suffering of individuals.

Gin and Coconut Curry

Gin and Coconut Curry

BY CHAPIN CIMINO
What stays with us over the decades: Navigating the grey mists of love and affection by the quirky light of a college friendship.

Read More »
Jordan Kisner

Ordinary Devotions

Jordan Kisner’s essay titled, ‘Soon This Space Will Be Too Small’, is a short musing about circular themes and thoughts that can revolve around a whole lifetime.

Read More »

Dad Too Late

BY KENT JACOBSON
My father clomped through life with boots—“Your mother will turn you into a softy”— and died early.

Read More »
AR ammons

A.R. Ammons – Play

The first lines of A.R. Ammons Play are an exaltation of the freedom contained within demise and a call to ‘yearn too high’ and ‘drill imagination through necessity.’

Read More »
Susan Murphy

The Great, Generous Laugh

Susan Murphy’s book, The Red Thread, addresses the guts and gore of the flesh-and-blood humans who sustain spiritual practice in the midst of desire, mortality and heartbreak.

Read More »

Yes, This

BY APRIL NANCE
I have a photograph of my childhood self taken by my Aunt Sandy. In the picture she has tamed my scraggly hair and combed it into a neat blonde bob.

Read More »
Bathtub Bubbles

The Rose-Pink Porcelain Bathtub

BY CHARLENE MOSKAL
At around age seven I’d lie in tepid water in the rose-pink porcelain bathtub. I would look down the skinny length of me, close my eyes, imagine I was Jesus.

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