THIS WEEK'S BLOG

William Stafford
Poetry

William Stafford’s Last Poem

Written in the morning of the day he died, William Stafford’s last poem rattles with augury gilded by a sense of acceptance.

INTERVIEWS

Leaving

BY MICHELLE NICHOLAYSEN
When I left the Seventh-day Adventists, I thought I could keep the love and forget the wrath.

Serape

BY SARAH CHAVERA EDWARDS
I never knew him in life. The man with calloused hands and almond eyes that would turn into half-moons when he laughed.

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MICRO GALLERY

Places I'd Like to Live: Ice Blue Mountains

Dave Sims – Watercolors

Dave Sims’ watercolor paintings are a submission to the chance of creation and a surrender to emptiness.

Garysomething

I Am Not Garysomething

BY SCOTT D. VANDER PLOEG
When a popular TV show killed off its loved professor, a real-life teacher paused to consider the implications of what it means to share in the student-teacher bond.

Sanctuary

BY KENT JACOBSON
A baseball field was a sanctuary for a small community of boys who were surrounded by angry fathers they were too young to understand.

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FEATURED AUTHORS AND POETS

BOOK EXCERPTS

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THE ALAN WATTS CORNER

Caroline Goodwin

Why I Write – Caroline Goodwin

Writing can be anything, from self-discovery to incorporating pain to establishing direction, according to poet Caroline Goodwin, who featured in The Dewdrop a couple of weeks ago with her poem, Not I’ll Not, from her book, Custody of the Eyes. 

THE BEATS

BROWSE BY THEME

MYSTICS

POPULAR READS

Zen Tree

FROM THE ZEN GARDEN

The Great, Generous Laugh

Susan Murphy’s book, The Red Thread, addresses the guts and gore of the flesh-and-blood humans who sustain spiritual practice in the midst of desire, mortality and heartbreak.

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Ryokan – Playing with the Children

Ryokan loved children, and played with them so much that other adults began to question his sanity. He says, ‘Even if I were able to say something/how could I explain?’ His wholehearted immersion in playful activity is the essence of Ryokan’s very particular Zen expression.

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KEEP READING

Thich Nhat Hanh

Anger Is Me and I Am Anger

Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh on how we can become intimate and compassionate with our own anger and even transform it into love.

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Rilke and the Labors of Love

Rilke stresses the importance of work in relationship and cautions against the youthful fancy that romance is the domain of play and pleasure.

Living Like Birds, Loving Like Birds

With her book, Earth’s Wild Music, Kathleen Dean Moore asks, what can we do in the midst of so much extinction? What is our moral imperative?

You Have to Have a Cup

The Empty Mirror is Janwillem van de Wettering’s memoir of his time at a Japanese Zen monastery where he stayed for over a year in the late 1950s.

Julia Park Tracey

Julia Park Tracey – Tufas

In Tufas, Julia Park Tracey offers a simple and quiet poem focused on the landscape and nature, with a sense of tragidy that’s only hinted at through her words.

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Ellen Bass

Ellen Bass – If You Knew

What if you knew you’d be the last to touch someone? Ellen Bass draws us in to the brief moments of contact that fill our day and urges us to consider the fleeting nature of every life we meet.

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Garysomething

I Am Not Garysomething

BY SCOTT D. VANDER PLOEG
When a popular TV show killed off its loved professor, a real-life teacher paused to consider the implications of what it means to share in the student-teacher bond.

Read More »
Billy Collins

Billy Collins – The Dead

Billy Collins runs with the folkloric notion that the dead are watching us and pushes the image all the way to a reverie of the departed ‘rowing themselves slowly through eternity’ in glass-bottomed boats.

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Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman – O Me! O Life!

Walt Whitman’s O Me! O Life! is a rousing remonstrance of a self-centered life of faithless, foolish, vain, mean struggle that asks the question, where does the good lie in the midst of this endeavor?

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Sanctuary - Kent Jacobson

Sanctuary

BY KENT JACOBSON
A baseball field was a sanctuary for a small community of boys who were surrounded by angry fathers they were too young to understand.

Read More »